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October 23, 2002

RSS application I would kill for

Job hunting sucks.

Lots of sites have "Careers" pages, or "Jobs" pages, or "Employment" pages. Surfing from one site to another, looking for new entries, while sitting at the keyboard of a text-processing and general computing machine unthinkable in 1980, sort of chafes my chaps. It would be so much better if the sites would maintain RSS feeds of their job listings.

The RSS Entry would just be the barebones of the job, of course:

<title>Window Washer</title>
<description>Fortune 500 company in Charlotte seeks talented, experienced window-washer. Must provide tools, rope, and lift.</description>
<link>http://www.schmoop.com/jobs/window-washer.html</link>

If it matched up, you would visit the site for application details.

I imagine we'll start to see vertical applications of RSS like this shortly; recruiting companies could serve as "job aggregators," attracting applicants by having deeper, broader feeds of available positions.

October 23, 2002 in About the web | Permalink

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Comments

I agree, it does suck.

The opportunity aggregator sounds nice, but recruiters would still stuff the listings full of ridiculous requirements:


  • PhD in CS with at least 5 patents award
  • 5 years experience in .Net application development
  • 10 years experience supervising technical staff
  • Must be able to code java bytecode compiler on white-board at interview: bring own markers

I am almost certain I will never work in technology again unless I create the job myself. I'm 40 years old, I have no technical degree, my experience seems worthless, and I can't play the buzzword bingo game.

What would be more interesting to me is some way of objectively mapping experience to skills with a real skill/experience inventory.

Posted by: paul at Oct 23, 2002 5:30:04 PM